birds

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Photographer captures surreal shapes of thousands of starlings’ murmurations

Danish photographer Søren Solkær has been capturing starling murmurations since 2017. This stunning phenomenon occurs when flocks of hundreds, even thousands of starlings fly creating patterns across the sky. Søren has captured their formations in a series of stunning images, and he kindly shared some of them with us. Interestingly enough, Søren is best known […]

The post Photographer captures surreal shapes of thousands of starlings’ murmurations appeared first on DIY Photography.

Visit the secret life of birds with 2021 Bird Photographer of the Year finalists

Bird Photographer of the Year is one of those contests that give us an insight into the fascinating and versatile world of animals. In this contest’s case, it’s obviously the birds. I personally love all feathery creatures, so I’m happy to share with you today the finalists of the 2021 WPOTY contest. The World Photographer […]

The post Visit the secret life of birds with 2021 Bird Photographer of the Year finalists appeared first on DIY Photography.

Finalists of the Bird Photographer of the Year 2021 Announced

The Bird Photographer of the Year Awards (BPOTY) has announced the finalists for its 2021 competition, with the winner to be announced in September. This selection is a “sneak preview” of what to expect from the 6th-annual awards.

This year’s competition saw over 22,000 entries from over 73 countries which have been narrowed down to the shortlist of finalists below who will go on to compete for the £5,000 cash prize (~$6,912). In addition to hosting the competition, the BPOTY says that it is a proud supporter of conservation and provides financial aid to grassroots conservation projects through its charity partner Birds on the Brink.

Photo by Brian Matthews / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Daniel Zhang / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Li Ying Lou / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Øyvind Pedersen / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Terry Whittaker / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Daniela Anger / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Gail Bisson / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Tom Schandy / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Mark Sisson / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Diana Schmies / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Scott Suriano / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Irene Waring / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Fahad Alenezi / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Irma Szabo / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Raymond Hennessy / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Brad James / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Amanda Cook / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Andy Parkinson / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Zdeněk Jakl / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by James Wilcox / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by David White / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Aguti Antonio
Photo by Gábor Li / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Mark Williams / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Tzahi Finkelstein / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Daphne Wong / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Anupam Chakraborty / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Taku Ono
Photo by Thomas Vijayan / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Eirik Grønningsæter / Bird Photographer of the Year
Photo by Mario Suarez Porras / Bird Photographer of the Year

Each of the images above is in the running for a set of awards across a group of categories along with the most-coveted title of Bird Photographer of the Year. Last year, the overall winner was Majed Alza’abi of Vardø, Norway, who captured an “artistic and impressionistic” photo of European Shag. You can see it and the other winners from the 2020 competition here.

The images here and others entered to the competition will be included in a book published by William Collins, the sixth in the collection. It will be a hardback, coffee-table book featuring the best images from the 2021 competition across 256 pages and filled with stunning images to inspire any keen bird photographer. Those interested in picking it up can pre-order it at the BPOTY website.


Image credits: All photos individually credited and provided courtesy of the Bird Photographer of the Year.

Woman builds a camera trap on birdfeeder to take adorable bird photos from up close

I don’t know about you, but when I see a birdie, I really wish I could get a closer look at it and have it land on my finger. Of course, wild birds aren’t really into that and they only let us admire them from afar. But Lisa aka Ostdrossel has found a way to […]

The post Woman builds a camera trap on birdfeeder to take adorable bird photos from up close appeared first on DIY Photography.

This Feeder-Mounted Camera Catches Striking, Closeup Photos of Birds

Typically, bird photographers use high-end cameras with telephoto lenses and trek out into the wilds but enthusiast Ostdrossel has a different method: she lets the birds come to her. Using a feeder-mounted camera, she remotely captures striking images of the birds that visit her home in Michigan.

Ostdrossel says that the images she shares are either taken with a timelapse setting or via a motion detector. The setup, which she details on her blog, is what she calls the Bird Photo Booth 2.0. The idea is similar to a design from 2012.

“It consists of this camera box, much like a trail camera, that has a macro lens on the top and a regular one on the bottom. Inside is a little shelf on which I place a small camera that has, amongst other things, a motion sensor function that I can set to take 10 pics per second,” she writes. “The bowl attachment comes with the camera as well. So whenever a bird makes it to the bowl, the camera takes pictures. If I leave the camera out the whole day, which happens a lot, I end up with up to 7000 photos, depending on the activity of the day. My evening pleasure and routine is to go through all of them, delete the bad ones and keep and slightly edit the ones I deem publishable.”

Ostdrossel mentions that she ends up with a lot of images, and that may not fully express how many photos she can end up with. Her Instagram is flush with photos dating back years, many of them unique looks at birds that rarely let you get this close to them.

“I installed my camera on a fabulous heavy inherited tripod and installed a baffle to keep the squirrels out,” she continues. “I put it in my yard each day, rain or shine, and so far have not had any major malfunctions. Since I have been feeding birds before I had the booth, they are very interested and willing to take mug shots. I am currently also experimenting with the bowl attachment, adding a tiny hummer feeder and a jelly container.”

She also uses a camera from Birdsy to capture videos of birds which she posts on her Instagram as well as a Livestream you can watch here of a birdbath in her yard. That camera is a Birdsy, the product of a successful Kickstarter that was designed to watch and identify birds using AI.

Ostdrossel features new birds everyday on her website and also offers a multitude of designs for masks that use images of the birds that pay her Bird Photo Booth a visit. For even more, make sure you follow her on Instagram.

(via My Modern Met)

Photographer films soothing slo-mo videos of birds eating from her hand

We’ve seen some incredible examples of bird photography, video, and even weirdly beautiful audio. But photographer Jocelyn Anderson takes filming birds on a more personal level. Her little models eat out of her hand, and I mean it quite literally. As she feeds them, she films them in a series of incredibly soothing and heartwarming […]

The post Photographer films soothing slo-mo videos of birds eating from her hand appeared first on DIY Photography.

Photographer Captures Birds Eating Out of Her Hand in Slow-Motion

Photographer Jocelyn Anderson captures beautiful images of birds in their natural habitats but also has a wonderfully calming ongoing YouTube series where she depicts different bird species eating out of the palm of her hand in slow motion.

Self-described as a “big fan of birds,” Anderson has published a huge gallery of different species on her Instagram as well as offers many for sale as prints, greeting cards, and calendars on her website.

And as excellent as her photography is, she doesn’t stop her hobby there. Her ongoing series of different bird species eating out of the palm of her hand in slow motion is wonderfully captivating and peaceful.

“I often visit a park that has birds that have been hand-fed for years. Since the birds are quite friendly, all I need to do is show up with some peanuts and sunflower seeds,” Anderson says. “Often smaller birds move too quickly for the human eye to catch the details of their movements. I use my iPhone 11 to record their flight and their antics while they select their snacks of choice. These birds are small but have big personalities!”

To see Anderson’s impressive collection of slow-motion videos of birds eating out her hand, subscribe to her YouTube Channel.

(via Laughing Squid)

Photographer captures the perfect moment after an owl lands on a telephoto lens

When photographing wild animals, we can capture lots of incredible moments in nature. But photographers Scott Joshua Dere and Beaumon Day witnessed quite an epic one! Thankfully, they also manage to capture it. A large owl landed on Scott’s lens and struck a pose, and Beaumon took a photo of the scene that you don’t […]

The post Photographer captures the perfect moment after an owl lands on a telephoto lens appeared first on DIY Photography.

Black Sun: Photos of Starling Flocks Darkening the Sky Over Denmark

Black Sun is an ongoing project by Danish photographer Søren Solkær, who began visiting the marshlands of southern Denmark a few years ago to capture the mesmerizing starling murmurations that comprise up to a million birds.

The giant flock darkens the sky with its ever-changing shapes.

“As the countless birds congregate in large murmurations before collectively settling in the reeds at dusk they put on an incredible show of collaboration and performance skills,” Solkær writes. “And now and then, by the added drama of attacking birds of prey, the flock will unfold a breathtaking and veritable ballet of life or death.

“At times the flock seems to possess the cohesive power of super fluids, changing shape in an endless flux: From geometric to organic, from solid to fluid, from matter to ethereal, from reality to dream – an exchange in which real time ceases to exist and mythical time pervades,” the photographer says. “This is the moment I have attempted to capture – a fragment of eternity.”

Here’s what these murmurations look like in motion:

Black Sun is now available as a photo book in Solkær’s online shop. You can also find more of his work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram.

(via Søren Solkær Colossal)


Image credits: Photographs by Søren Solkær and used with permission