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“She Can Only Function in the Dark”: Writer/Director Corinna Faith On Her Female-Led, ’70s-Set Ghost Story, The Power

Set during London’s so-called “Three-Day Week” period — just over two months in 1974 when Conservatives in Britain rationed electricity as part of a dispute with the coal miners whose output supplied most of the country’s energy — Corinna Faith’s The Power is an impressively accomplished debut feature that yokes a classic ghost story to the dynamics of the contemporary #MeToo movement. Val is an apprentice nurse working her first night shift in an aging East London hospital. There are plenty of shadows as lights go out in unused areas, and gas lanterns are the most frequent source of illumination. […]

The post “She Can Only Function in the Dark”: Writer/Director Corinna Faith On Her Female-Led, ’70s-Set Ghost Story, The Power first appeared on Filmmaker Magazine.

Journeys Through French Cinema, The Projectionist and Test Pattern: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Recommendations

When writer, director, and film historian Bertrand Tavernier passed away on March 25, the art of cinema lost one of its most eloquent, passionate, and informed partisans. Thankfully, his last great work, the eight-hour documentary series Journeys Through French Cinema, is newly available on Blu-ray from Cohen Media Group and provides a beautiful summation of Tavernier’s devotion and an enlightening introduction to many of his favorite filmmakers. The documentary is a follow-up to Tavernier’s 2016 theatrical feature My Journey Through French Cinema and essentially picks up where that movie left off, exploring directors, actors, composers, and other artists Tavernier wasn’t […]

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Defending Your Life, The Producers and Spaceballs: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Recommendations

The best film by America’s greatest comic filmmaker arrives on Blu-ray this week in the form of Criterion’s release of Albert Brooks’ Defending Your Life. Some Brooks partisans might argue on behalf of the more acidic and self-flagellating Modern Romance or the more influential Real Life (and if you caught me on certain days I could probably be convinced that Mother is as great a movie as anyone has ever made), but Defending Your Life is the director’s most philosophically dense, emotionally satisfying, and conceptually ambitious comedy, an inquiry into the meaning of existence as serious as Tree of Life […]

The post Defending Your Life, The Producers and Spaceballs: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Recommendations first appeared on Filmmaker Magazine.

Laowa Unveils 1.33x Rear Anamorphic Adapter, 1.4x Full Frame Expander

Venus Optics has announced the 1.4x Full Frame Expander and 1.33x Rear Anamorphic Adapter in PL to PL mount. The anamorphic adapter expands the filming canvas to a 2.35:1 cinematic widescreen ratio on a 16:9 sensor and the 1.4x Full Frame Expander expands the coverage from Super35 into full-frame.

In the case of both adapters, Laowa claims that there is no hit in resolution or image quality, but there are some tradeoffs for each.

For example, when paired with Laowa’s OOOM 25-100mm T2.9 Cine Lens, the 1.33x Anamorphic Adapter can successfully expand the film canvas but does not produce the oval bokeh or horizontal field of view like a true anamorphic lens would, but Laowa says that it still introduces “cinematic character” and can create that distinctive anamorphic flare look. When using the adapter, lenses lose a half stop of light as well.

Below is a full list of compatible lenses, other than Laowa’s OOOM:

  • Angenieux 28-340mm Optimo Zoom T3.2

  • Angenieux 24-290mm Optimo Zoom T2.8
  • Angenieux Optimo Style 16-40mm T2.8 Zoom

  • Angenieux Optimo Style 30-76mm T2.8 Zoom

  • Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 25 mm T1.5
  • Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 29 mm T1.5
  • Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 35 mm T1.5
  • 
Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 50 mm T1.5

  • Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 85 mm T1.5
  • 
Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 15mm T2.9 

  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 18 mm T2.9

  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 25 mm T2.1
  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 28 mm T2.1

  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 35 mm T2.1

  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 50 mm T2.1

  • Carl Zeiss Compact Prime 85 mm T2.1

  • ARRI 18-80mm Alura Studio Zoom T2.6
  • 
ARRI 45-250MM T2.6

Venus Optics proided a few sample screenshots showing how footage that uses the adapter looks:

The 1.4x Full-Frame Expander can offset the aberrations found on cinema lenses and also expand the coverage from Super35 to Full-Frame. Laowa says that it does this while also maintaining the “vintage characters and excellent optical performance” of the lens. During the expansion, one stop of light is lost, which isn’t a terrible tradeoff for turning a high-end lens designed for Super35 sensors into an optic that can work on full-frame cameras.

The Expander also has a specially-designed back-focus adjustment mechanism that replaces what Venus Optics describes as a “tedious procedure of back focus adjustments by shims.”

Below is a list of compatible lenses, again other than the Laowa OOOM:

  • Angenieux EZ-2 15-40mm T2.0

  • Angenieux EZ-1 30-90mm T2.0 
  • Angenieux EZ-1 45-135MM T3

  • Angenieux EZ2 FF 22-60mm T3

  • Canon CN-E 15.5-47mm T2.8 L S Wide-Angle Cinema Zoom
  • 
Canon CN-E 30-105mm T2.8 L S Telephoto Cinema Zoom
  • ARRI Ultra Prime 85mm T1.9

  • Carl Zeiss Supreme Prime 29 mm T1.5

  • Carl Zeiss Cinema Zoom 15-30mm

Both adapters are built entirely of metal, are shipped with a protective case, and are available for $1000 each or as a bundle together for $1,800.